Large Study Finds Systemic Age Discrimination in High Tech

Silicon ValleyThe only thing shocking about a new study showing that rampant age discrimination exists in the high tech industry is that anyone didn’t already know that.

However, Visier Insights Report: The Truth About Ageism in the Tech Industry, provides fascinating detail based upon a solid database of  330,000 employees from 43 large U.S. enterprises.

A Canada-based provider of workforce analytic services to companies around the world, Visier concludes “systemic ageism” exists in the high tech industry compared to the non-tech industry. The average tech worker is 38 years old, compared to 43 years old for non-tech workers. The average manager in the tech industry is 42 years old, compared to 47 for non-tech industries.

It has been known for years that age discrimination in rampant in Silicon Valley but the EEOC, which is charged with enforcing the Age Discrimination in Employment Act,  has almost completely ignored the problem, even as national magazines featured stories about 30-year-old tech workers flocking to plastic surgeons in an effort to appear young .

The Visier report  is more proof that the high tech workforce is marked by “significant” over-representation of millennials, between the ages of 20 and 33, and Gen X workers, between the ages of 34 and 51. Millennials comprise 42.6 percent of the high tech workforce  compared to 26.1 percent of the non-tech workforce, and Gen X workers comprise 42.6 percent of the high tech workforce compared to 46.4 percent of the non-tech workforce. Continue reading “Large Study Finds Systemic Age Discrimination in High Tech”

Ageism is Bad – Except in Silicon Valley?

GlobalAgingA report last year by the Milken Institute’s Center for the Future of Aging  reaches a shockingly ageist conclusion – a younger workforce is “tremendously beneficial” for growth in industries like Silicon Valley.

The 2016 report, Redefining Traditional Notions of Aging; Embracing Longevity Across Cultures,  discusses the evils of ageism and goes on to state:

“Granted, there are industries and sectors within the economy in which a younger workforce is tremendously beneficial to growth. This is especially true in places like Silicon Valley, the global bastion for young budding technology engineers and entrepreneurs.”

The authors credit Silicon Valley’s youthful workplace for “creative ideas and the abilities to build new products and provide new services have boosted innovation, efficiency, and economic growth.” The report notes the average age at Google is 30; Facebook, 28; LinkedIn 29;  and Apple, 31.

(The authors do not acknowledge that the average ages noted above are the result of pervasive and unaddressed age discrimination in Silicon Valley, which technically is illegal under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967.) Continue reading “Ageism is Bad – Except in Silicon Valley?”

Why Doesn’t Age Discrimination Count in U.S.?

At the end of the month, most employers with more than 100 employees are required file a form with the EEOC revealing diversity and job category information about the race/ethnicity and gender of their workforce.

But companies are nUnemployment Benefitsot required to tell the EEOC anything about the age of their workers.

The EEOC lacks the type of critical data about age that it collects and uses to prevent and hold employers accountable for race or sex discrimination.

 This is yet another way that age discrimination is ignored and rendered invisible in the United State.

According to the EEOC, the information from Equal Employment Opportunity – 1 Reports (EEO-1) is used to:

  • “… support civil rights enforcement and to analyze employment patterns, such as the representation of female and minority workers within companies, industries or regions.”; and
  • “…to determine which company establishments to select for compliance reviews.”

Employers must provide statistics with respect to the number of minorities and women in their workforce and in what capacity they work. This is significant because it puts informal pressure on employers to hire minorities and women for “careers” rather than jobs.

For obvious reasons, employers are loathe to tell the EEOC that 16 of a company’s 17 African-American employees work the janitorial pool or 39 of the firm’s 40 female employees are secretaries or administrative assistants. It looks bad. This provides an incentive for  employers to actually recruit and hire minorities and females for professional “career” positions. Continue reading “Why Doesn’t Age Discrimination Count in U.S.?”


Silicon Valley has been an unapologetic apartheid state for young workers for years but this could be about to change.

A class action age discrimination lawsuit was filed against Google, Inc. on April 22 by software engineer Robert Heath who was interviewed but not hired for a position at Google in 2011 when he was 60-years-of-age. The lawsuit alleges Google has demonstrated a pattern and practice of violating the Age Discrimination in Employment and the California Fair Employment and Housing Act.

According to the lawsuit, Google’s workforce is “grossly disproportionate” with respect to age. The lawsuit asserts the median age of the 28,000 employees who worked for Google in 2013 was 29.  Meanwhile, the U.S. Department of Labor reports the median age for computer programmers in the United States is 42.8 and the median age for software developers is 40.6. According to the lawsuit, Google had 53,000 employees in 2014 and revenues of approximately $66 billion.

Google’s position with respect to age discrimination is completely inexplicable. The company last year made a public commitment to increase race and gender diversity in its workforce, and released workforce statistics relating to those characteristics. But Google was completely silent with respect to  age and did not release age-related statistics. It was as if Google’s position was that age is not a factor in workforce diversity.