Obama’s Misguided Plan to Boost Diversity Through Age Discrimination

A better plan would be to create an equal playing field, regardless of race, sex, religion, national origin, disability, and age. Isn’t that what Martin Luther King advocated?

In a difficult economy, generations often find themselves pitted against each other for scarce resources, including jobs. But there is a new twist to this theme today. In recent years, the U.S.government has justified age discrimination as a way of increasing  “diversity” in federal hiring.

President Barack Obama signed an executive order in 2010 that permits the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) to  bypass older workers and hire “recent graduates.” The regulations went into effect on July 10, 2012.

Obama said he wanted to remove “barriers” in hiring younger workers  caused by civil service regulations and “to achieve a workforce that represents all segments of society.” Obama  wants to “infuse” the federal government with the “enthusiasm, talents and  unique perspective” of young people.

More recently, Obama’s Labor Secretary, Thomas E. Perez,  publicly endorsed a private initiative by some of America’s leading corporations to blatantly violate the Age Discrimination in Employment Act by hiring 100,000 disadvantaged inner city residents between the ages of 16 and 24 for full-time and part-time jobs.

There are so many reasons why Obama’s  “winners and losers” plan to boost diversity is just plain  wrong.

 Obama’s strategy is counter intuitive. Discrimination cannot be contained in neat little categories. Age discrimination builds on race and sex discrimination. This is why women, especially minority women, are the most prone to poverty in their old age. Obama’s approach simply kicks the can down the road. Continue reading “Obama’s Misguided Plan to Boost Diversity Through Age Discrimination”


Silicon Valley has been an unapologetic apartheid state for young workers for years but this could be about to change.

A class action age discrimination lawsuit was filed against Google, Inc. on April 22 by software engineer Robert Heath who was interviewed but not hired for a position at Google in 2011 when he was 60-years-of-age. The lawsuit alleges Google has demonstrated a pattern and practice of violating the Age Discrimination in Employment and the California Fair Employment and Housing Act.

According to the lawsuit, Google’s workforce is “grossly disproportionate” with respect to age. The lawsuit asserts the median age of the 28,000 employees who worked for Google in 2013 was 29.  Meanwhile, the U.S. Department of Labor reports the median age for computer programmers in the United States is 42.8 and the median age for software developers is 40.6. According to the lawsuit, Google had 53,000 employees in 2014 and revenues of approximately $66 billion.

Google’s position with respect to age discrimination is completely inexplicable. The company last year made a public commitment to increase race and gender diversity in its workforce, and released workforce statistics relating to those characteristics. But Google was completely silent with respect to  age and did not release age-related statistics. It was as if Google’s position was that age is not a factor in workforce diversity.