The American Lawyer forms a ‘Young Lawyer’ Editorial Board

Gina Passarella Cipriani

It is ironic that the legal profession is one of the worst in terms of adherence to the age discrimination in employment.

There are many lawsuits describing how law firms use creative means to get rid of older workers and law firms in past years have run ads that  blatantly targeted new attorneys for hire, while discouraging older lawyers.

Perhaps it should be no surprise the The American Lawyer, a monthly magazine published by ALM Media in New York City, has “proudly” announced it has formed a “Young Lawyer Editorial Board.” The members “range from just a year or so out of law school to some serving as young partners in their firms.” According to the magazine’s web site: “The goal of this board is to serve as a voice for the next generation of professionals in the legal profession.”

Is there an old editorial board that is the voice of the past generation?

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For the “New” News Media, There is No Past, Only a Self-Congratulatory Present

pumping ironFor years, there has been litigation over the fact that the internet is being used to screen out the resumes of older workers and deposit them in a digital trash can.

But suddenly the powers that be are taking notice in the wake of a supposed investigative story on Dec. 20 by ProPublica and The New York Times about Facebook permitting employers to exclude older workers from receiving employment and recruitment ads. That’s a good thing but …

That NYT story was based largely upon a Dec. 20  federal class action lawsuit filed by the Communications Workers of America against major employers that use Facebook to screen out older job applicants. And the CWA lawsuit is the latest of several to challenge the use of internet technology to target young job applicants and screen out older job applicants.

In fact, the U.S. Supreme Court last year refused to hear a case involving a 2010 lawsuit brought by Richard Villarreal against R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. that alleged Reynolds hired recruiters to develop an algorithm that was used to screen out older applicants for job vacancies on CareerBuilder (which settled its part of the case out of court). The legal press (including me) wrote extensively about the case.  This matters because it shows that the government has been on notice for years that the internet is being used as a tool to effectuate epidemic age discrimination in hiring. Continue reading “For the “New” News Media, There is No Past, Only a Self-Congratulatory Present”